SPOKE WITH HER DAUGHTER TONIGHT.>> SHE IS ALL ABOUT FAMILY. SARAH: 80-YEAR-OLD CLAIRE ANN KRUIZENGA DEVOTED HER LIFE TO HER DAUGHTERS.>> TO KNOW HER IS TO LOVE HER, TRULY. IF SOMEBODY HADN’T MET HER, THEY LOST OUT. SARAH: KRUIZENGA LOST HER BATTLE WITH CORONAVIRUS ON MAY 22. SHE’D BEEN RUSHED TO THE HOSPITAL FROM A REHAB FACILITY, AND PUT ON A VENTILATOR.>> MOM DIDN’T HAVE ANY HEART ISSUES, BUT THE VIRUS WAS CLEARLY ATTACKING HER HEART. AND SHE HAD SOME ABNORMAL THINGS GOING ON. AND THEY WERE REALLY BATTLING AND CHALLENGING THAT JUST ON A HONESTLY, ON A MINUTE TO MINUTE BASIS. SARAH: HER DAUGHTER LESLIE VOIGT SAYS THERE WAS ONE RAY OF HOPE AT THE HOSPITAL.>> IF THERE WERE ANY OPTIONS, YOU KNOW, FOR THE CONVALESCENT PLASMA OR YOU KNOW, ANY OF THE THE MEDICATIONS THAT WE’D BE OPEN TO TRY ANYTHING. SARAH: SHE SAYS HER MOM WAS APPROVED FOR A TRIAL BY THE MAYO CLINIC, WHERE ANTIBODIES IN A COVID-19 SURVIVOR’S PLASMA CAN BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE STILL SUFFERING. IT CAME THE VERY NEXT DA>> ONCE SHE GOT THAT PLASMA, IT SEEMED TO REALLY ALL THE IMPACTS TO HER CARDIAC SYSTEM, I FELT LIKE WHEN MAYBE WENT AWAY, AND IT ENABLED HER TO BE ABLE TO USE HER ENERGY AND FIGHT. SARAH: THE PLASMA GAVE THEM ENOUGH TIME, TO SAY GOODBYE. VOIGT SAYS SHE’S THANKFUL JUST FOR THE CHANCE GIVEN TO HER

‘To know her was to love her’: Family says convalescent plasma helped mother fight COVID-19

Claire Ann Kruizenga died May 22, but her family says convalescent plasma helped her fight.

A woman said convalescent plasma helped her mother battle COVID-19, even though she still lost her life.Claire Ann Kruizenga died May 22.“To know her is to love her, truly. If somebody hadn’t met her, they truly lost out,” said Leslie Voigt, her daughter. She’d been rushed to the hospital from a rehab facility in respiratory distress and was put on a ventilator. “My mom didn’t have any heart issues, but the virus was clearly attacking her heart. And she had some abnormal things going on. They were really battling and challenging that just on an, honestly, minute to minute basis,” Voigt said.Voigt said in conversations with doctors, there was one ray of hope at the hospital.”If there were any options, you know, for the convalescent plasma or you know, any of the medications that we’d be open to try anything,” Voigt said.She said her mom was approved for a trial by the Mayo clinic, in which antibodies in a COVID-19 survivor’s plasma can be given to someone still suffering. The plasma came the very next day.”Once she got that plasma, it seemed to really, all the impacts to her cardiac system, I felt like maybe went away, and it enabled her to be able to use her energy and fight,” Voigt said.The plasma gave them enough time to say goodbye. Voigt said she’s thankful just for the chance given to her mom.”Oh, we were quite honored. Just completely blessed. How another donor would bless us like that, and we don’t know who it was, but we’re just extremely grateful for the opportunity to be in that trial,” Voigt said.She hopes people who beat COVID-19 will consider donating plasma for everyone who’s in this fight.“Our biggest thing is, we want everybody to know that options are out there, regardless, and that it takes everybody. We want people to give blood,” Voigt said.”I think the research study itself will be a long-term study, and we’re just hopeful that her information helps other people.” Both the Red Cross and Nebraska Community Blood Bank are collecting convalescent plasma.

OMAHA, Neb. —

A woman said convalescent plasma helped her mother battle COVID-19, even though she still lost her life.

Claire Ann Kruizenga died May 22.

“To know her is to love her, truly. If somebody hadn’t met her, they truly lost out,” said Leslie Voigt, her daughter. She’d been rushed to the hospital from a rehab facility in respiratory distress and was put on a ventilator.

“My mom didn’t have any heart issues, but the virus was clearly attacking her heart. And she had some abnormal things going on. They were really battling and challenging that just on an, honestly, minute to minute basis,” Voigt said.

Voigt said in conversations with doctors, there was one ray of hope at the hospital.

“If there were any options, you know, for the convalescent plasma or you know, any of the medications that we’d be open to try anything,” Voigt said.

She said her mom was approved for a trial by the Mayo clinic, in which antibodies in a COVID-19 survivor’s plasma can be given to someone still suffering. The plasma came the very next day.

“Once she got that plasma, it seemed to really, all the impacts to her cardiac system, I felt like maybe went away, and it enabled her to be able to use her energy and fight,” Voigt said.

The plasma gave them enough time to say goodbye.

Voigt said she’s thankful just for the chance given to her mom.

“Oh, we were quite honored. Just completely blessed. How another donor would bless us like that, and we don’t know who it was, but we’re just extremely grateful for the opportunity to be in that trial,” Voigt said.

She hopes people who beat COVID-19 will consider donating plasma for everyone who’s in this fight.

“Our biggest thing is, we want everybody to know that options are out there, regardless, and that it takes everybody. We want people to give blood,” Voigt said.

“I think the research study itself will be a long-term study, and we’re just hopeful that her information helps other people.”

Both the Red Cross and Nebraska Community Blood Bank are collecting convalescent plasma.

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